Developing a Vaccine

It is hoped that a vaccine can be developed for the virus quickly. That may not be so easy

There are some early results suggesting that antibodies to the spike protein of the virus have some promise in protecting cells against infection. Translating this into a vaccine which is safe to administer to millions of healthy people will not be quick

https://www.theverge.com/2020/2/28/21156385/covid-coronavirus-vaccine-treatment-moderna-remdesivir-research

Development of any pharmaceutical needs careful development. Progress occurs through phase 1 (safety) studies, through phase 2 and 3 (efficacy) studies. Research to refine the target population and the optimum dose is required.

Rushing such a thing can lead to problems. It is widely thought that immunization for the “swine flu” in 1976 caused an outbreak of Guillain-Barre´ s syndrome. There were issues with the testing and manufacture in response to the pandemic

https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-pdf/176/Supplement_1/S69/2797707/176-Supplement_1-S69.pdf

That can be contrasted with the careful development of the Gardasil vaccine

http://www.hu.ufsc.br/projeto_hpv/Safety,%20immunogenicity,%20and%20effi%20cacy%20of%20quadrivalent%20human.pdf

which took years of development.

Potentially life saving experimental treatment for desperately unwell patients with no other options is one thing. Giving inadequately tested vaccine to healthy people is another entirely